SchoolsEstela Romero

"Pancho Maya", Kindergarten

SchoolsEstela Romero
"Pancho Maya", Kindergarten

SCHOOL VISIT.-

“Pancho Maya” is a very tiny village located a few kilometers inside the forest at the back-buffer area to Sanctuary Sierra Chincua. Due to the high altitude (3,400 mts/three thousand four hundred mts.) where most of these schools around this Monarch Colony in this Sanctuary are located, most families can only live from forest resources all over the year selling either chopped wood for heating homes at the nearby towns, medicine herbs for medical treatment at home, —which is an ancestral practice we Mexican people keep for generations and on which our parents, grandparents and great-grandparents have deep knowledge—, and a large variety of eatable, delicious mushrooms during our long raining season which lasts sometimes neary half of the year. On the other side, the climate conditions only allow for corn, potatos and wheat sowing, which is the main working and trading activity for fathers and older brothers in every family. At explaining to these little children the importance of Monarcha of pollinators in our region as well as bees, wasps, bats, and hummingbirds among others, they could immediately recognize them and could get perfectly become aware of their importance. In the posters shown to them, they had lost of fun recognizing every single pollinator insect: “I can see bees and hummingbirds all over the day at the patio at home landing on every little flower”, —one said—; “Mom and dad have got two bee boxes in the backyard at home”, —the other replied proudly—; “I did not know that bats were also important!, can it be true?”; “So this means that our wild flowers outside in the woods and the meadows and praries are so important than those Mom buys for decorating our home?”. “We promise we will take very much care of all of them” —they cried out in chorus looking at the colorful posters as they recognized every single pollinator insect there, not to say Monarch Butterflies, and got so amazed about bats being so important for pollination, being cactus one of their favorite plants!. They loved to hold in their hands most of the delicious fruits carried to them in the box, as Estela helped them recognize some of them like: “Chirimoyas, Granadas, Papayas , Higos, Tejocotes, Andrinas, etcetera, as well as the names of the most common wild flowers outside their school yard. ”. During its visits, the Symbolic Migration project tries to stress to children the way we are rich in natural resources, flora and fauna, the way Monarch Butterflies have changed our lives and made us realize the importance of the conservation of our surrounding ecosystem. “Did you know that it took to our forests thousands and thousands and thousands of years to grow and be the way you can see it now?”. “Could you imagine not having all these around from where to get water, food and a job for our parents and brothers", —Estela Asked them—. “Nooooo”, —they immediately responded—. “We will love and care for it all more and more”, —they added as they simply forgot at Estela’s creeping out of their classrooms and hurried to open their envelopes with their presents sent by their counterparts in the North, in signal of the link that Mathusalen Monarchs have built over the years between Northamerican, Canadian and Mexican children at which back of their cozy homes millions and millions of Monarch butterflies have just arrived weeks ago and start to overwinter in our majestic Oyamel forests!.

SYMBOLIC MONARCHS RECEIVED HERE.- 556-564

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