SchoolsEstela Romero

"Telebachillerato Comunitario", San Jerónimo Pilitas.

SchoolsEstela Romero
"Telebachillerato Comunitario", San Jerónimo Pilitas.

SCHOOL VISIT.-

The “San Jerónimo Pilitas” little village is right beside neighbouring the “Pancho Maya” tiny village, both protecting the buffer zones to Sanctuary Sierra Chincua, where Monarchs capriciously occupy territory at both sides of the border line between the State of México and Michoacán. In this little village, located on the side of the State of México, very much inside and behind this Monarchs’ important colony, a tiny high school is open for youngsters to families living in these and a few other family settlements. Even though students at such a tiny school do not count on internet service in their classrooms, and being rather far from the closest town to an average of 15 kilometers to reach internet service facilities, their own books, cell phones and television signal and, in certain open areas in the village signal enough to access to facebook service, let them be quite informed and aware on different topics and events going on in the world. Most students, once they end this level will not continue university or college studies. Most will stay in the village and help to little by little train themselves to become the future young owners of their own lands and forests as young Ejidatarios (owners of the rights of their land areas and its natural resources); the least will go to big cities in search of a job. Once the theme on pollinators is presented to them, they immeditely grasp the topic and show themselves how well informed they are on the affectations due to use of pesticides and chemical fertilizers in agricultural activities!. “Yes, teacher Estelita, the State and local authorities are now more and more interested in coming periodically to train our parents by developing workshops in our communities to get them learn about natural ways to treat the soil for agricultural purposes as well as for avoiding plagues”; What they did not seem to quite remember or know, was the importance of pollinator insects in the process of pollination, believing that actually only a few species of bees were the main actors in this natural process. “See how all species of hummingbirs, bats, monarch butterflies and all kinds of other butterflies, moths, wasps, and of course the many species of bees, are determining in this process!”. They were astonished to hear this!. “How can it be that moths, that bats are also pollinators?”, —they expressed trapped in surprise—. Maybe they did not learn it, maybe they thid not remeber it from their elementary school times… They were really amused as they challenged themselves to remember and make their classmates remember the names of as many local, wild flowers in the woods and outside in our praries and meadows: “Mirto, Arnica, Girasoles, Margaritas, Moradilla, Chaquirilla, Hoja Ancha”, —they proudly told each other—, “several of these important nectar sources to Monarchs!”, —they recognized!. They also went over the abundant types fruits we have during the summer: “this and that kind of apples, peaches, capulines, tejocotes, andrinas, peras, higos, our delicious chiles manzanos, vegetables, wild eatable mushrooms…”, and grains from farming activities by local families… “all of these possible thanks mainly to pollinators!”, —they exclaimed in big, big surprise—… One could see how wonderfully concerned and interested they got in the topic and felt responsible for the conservation of our own local habitat, not only for Monarchs, but for the assurance of our own future lives. “No matter where you go within the coming years for studies of whatever other self development, you will always long to come back home; preserving your lands and forests will be the biggest treasure you could have stored for your own future”, —Estela concluded—, while they continued the talk on the many ways that a sustainable way of life is nowadays becoming urgent but fortunately possible; very, very compensating to see how new generations are really taking this topic as determining for their own lives and future possibilities.

AMBASSADOR MONARCHS RECEIVED HERE: 566 - 577

*** Ambassador Monarch 565 was for sure mixed at any moment on arriving to the student’s classroom. At every visit, the box with Ambassador Monarchs is filled in strict numerical order; very easily, students come to it, and, anxious to see them, they take one or two out and put it back not in the same cronological order; seldom to happen, but we now offer apologies. Please see Ambassador 565 in next school posted next to this.

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